TEST SITE: ALL PAGES ARE A WORK IN PROGRESS - LIKELY TO CHANGE OR BREAK!

Best viewed on desktop/laptop - click all the icons, links, buttons and drop-down triangles to see how it works


Dermatology DDx list disclaimer: please read
  • This dermatological differential diagnosis table is a simplified way of assessing dermatological cases and includes what we think will cover most primary care presentations. This does not mean other conditions should not be considered.
  • The body site and morphological division of the clinical conditions presented here is somewhat arbitrary, and the authors have used editorial licence to allow quicker access during the consultation and to prevent duplication.
  • In reality skin lesion morphology and the clinical presentation of dermatological conditions are highly variable and complex. Please consult the linked medical websites and images for a fuller description of the disease conditions.
  • Many diagnoses are not obvious or apparent at the initial presentation. It may be appropriate to share your diagnostic uncertainty with patient, and also provide specific guidance on when and where patients should seek further advice and follow up.
Brown/Black colour
Melanoma 📸
Pigmented BCC 📸
Atypical Naevi 📸
Naevi 📸
(blue, halo, spitz etc)
Dermatofibroma 📸
Neurofibroma 📸
Lentigines 📸
Lentigo maligna 📸
Seborrhoeic keratosis 📸
Pigmented actinic keratosis 📸

Early detection of melanoma
  • Aid to diagnosis 📸
  • ABCDE checklist
  • The ‘Ugly Duckling’ sign 📸
  • Glasgow 7-point checklist
    • Major features: (2 points each)
    • Change in size
    • Irregular shape or border
    • Irregular colour
    • Minor features: (1 point each)
    • Diameter 7 mm or more
    • Inflammation
    • Oozing or crusting
    • Sensation change (e.g.itch)
    • (Suspicious if 3 or more points)
  • Making referral decisions
  • Dermoscopy – DermnetNZ
    Dermatology DDx list disclaimer: please read
    • This dermatological differential diagnosis table is a simplified way of assessing dermatological cases and includes what we think will cover most primary care presentations. This does not mean other conditions should not be considered.
    • The body site and morphological division of the clinical conditions presented here is somewhat arbitrary, and the authors have used editorial licence to allow quicker access during the consultation and to prevent duplication.
    • In reality skin lesion morphology and the clinical presentation of dermatological conditions are highly variable and complex. Please consult the linked medical websites and images for a fuller description of the disease conditions.
    • Many diagnoses are not obvious or apparent at the initial presentation. It may be appropriate to share your diagnostic uncertainty with patient, and also provide specific guidance on when and where patients should seek further advice and follow up.

    Feedback or report an error on this page